humansofnewyork:

"I pretty much love every video game."
"What’s something you’ve learned from video games that you can apply to real life?"
"Never trust the bad guy."
"How do you know if it’s a bad guy?"
"Because he’ll ask you to get in his car."

npr:

The first issue of Marvel’s new Thor is now on newsstands. In it, a mysterious woman shows that she, too, is worthy of wielding the hammer of Thor.

She joins a growing list of superhuman heroines leading their own comic books — Captain Marvel, Batgirl and Catwoman, among others — as Marvel and DC push to diversify and improve the representation of women on their pages.

Part of this improvement comes through in the way these characters are dressed. Instead of a tight black bathing suit, Captain Marvel now wears a red, blue and yellow jumpsuit that evokes her Air Force roots. Over in Gotham, Batgirl has ditched the tight spandex and bright yellow heels for a leather motorcycle jacket, a detachable cape and Doc Martens.

Where’s Thor When You Need Her? Women In Comics Fight An Uphill Battle

Image credit: Marvel

nprbooks:

Just a glimpse of our process here in the Books Lair — we like to set aside food and drink related books for our buddies at The Salt (though I might swipe those homebrewing books because beer = yum).
You can check out past book stories from The Salt here — why DOES booze give us hangovers? How come some people love bitter tastes? And where do some of our common food words come from? Ketchup, for example, probably has its origins in Chinese — check out this cool chart:

— Petra
  • Camera: iPhone 5c
  • Aperture: f/2.4
  • Exposure: 1/20th
  • Focal Length: 4mm

nprbooks:

Just a glimpse of our process here in the Books Lair — we like to set aside food and drink related books for our buddies at The Salt (though I might swipe those homebrewing books because beer = yum).

You can check out past book stories from The Salt here — why DOES booze give us hangovers? How come some people love bitter tastes? And where do some of our common food words come from? Ketchup, for example, probably has its origins in Chinese — check out this cool chart:

— Petra